Devil’s Glen Access Update

By | Access | No Comments

Yesterday, climbers at Devil’s Glen were approached by Ontario Parks wardens and advised that climbing is no longer tolerated on the cliffside areas located on Ontario Parks property. (This applies to all routes east of, or to the climber’s right of, the Nutcracker area. Routes farther west are located on Crown Land, which Ontario Parks has no authority over.)

The OAC has contacted Ontario Parks to obtain an official statement on these new enforcement measures. Until we receive a formal statement, we will not acknowledge a change in access status to this public land. Climbing at Devil’s Glen is considered Tolerated and climbers have long been great ambassadors for this beautiful area.

Climbers are encouraged to continue climbing at Devil’s Glen in the meantime. If you encounter park staff and are asked to move, please obtain the contact information of the staff member and provide them with the OAC’s email address (info@ontarioallianceofclimbers.ca). If you are threatened with a ticket, please ask them to clarify what the exact offence is and the amount of the fine. If you encounter park staff or local homeowners, please be respectful and provide details of your encounter to the OAC as soon as possible.

Thank you for your support as we work towards resolution.

Attention: Devil’s Glen Climbers

By | Access | No Comments

We have been in recent discussions with local homeowners concerning climber behaviour at Devil’s Glen. While the local homeowners are supportive of climbers, there has been an increase in issues related to parking, trespassing & garbage.

Park along Concession Road 10.  Do not park on Highway 124 between the trailhead at the pedestrian side and Concession Road 10.
  • Parking – Do not park near homeowner driveways. This can create a frustrating and dangerous situation for homeowners getting in and out of their driveways. Park on Concession Road 10 whenever possible.
  • Trespassing – Do not trespass through homeowner land to access the park. The police will be called if anyone is found trespassing.
  • Dogs – If you MUST bring your dog, it must remain leashed and you must carry out dog waste. Even left behind in a biodegradable bag, your dog waste remains an eye sore for over a year and is disruptive for other park users who frequent the trails near the water, along the cliff base and above. The OAC recommends against bringing your dog to parks where climbing access is only listed as “Tolerated”.  Devil’s Glen is a crag at which climbing is only “Tolerated”.
  • Human Waste & Toilet Paper – If you are caught in an emergency and need to poop and/or use toilet paper at the crag, the OAC recommends packing out all your waste.  If you are unable to pack it out, you must bury your waste at least 6-8 inches deep and 200 feet away from the nearby river and trails. Toilet paper can take up to 3 years to decompose, and poop can take up to a year.
  • Drones – Recreational drones are not permitted in Provincial parks. Under no circumstance should you bring a drone to Devil’s Glen or any other Ontario Park. Not only are they illegal but they are extremely disruptive to fellow climbers.

Virtual Town Hall Recap – January 18, 2021

By | Access, Community, News | No Comments

Thank you to everyone who tuned into our latest Virtual Town Hall! We had over 160 attendees tune in throughout the night, with great discussion about access issues at some key Ontario crags.

Campden, Rockwood, and the Turtle (all of which are currently closed to climbing) were discussed in depth, as well as lockdown restrictions and some much needed talk about our mandate as an organization.

A complete recording of the meeting is available below. We look forward to seeing you out and about soon! ūü§ě

QUICK LINKS:

0:03:55 – Who we are
0:05:38 – What we do
0:11:46 – Covid update
0:24:25 – Rockwood
0:35:10 – Turtle
0:37:53 – Campden
0:51:17 – Ice climbing updates
0:56:05 – Other updates (education initiatives, access negotiations, Conservation Halton & the Turtle)
1:00:01 – Community Questions via email (Beaver Valley hunting season, Devil’s Glen and Metcalfe parking, Lion’s Head, drones, bouldering development enquiries)
1:18:44 – Live Community Questions (Crag X, winter Kolapore access is ski only, OAC fundraising model)

Virtual Town Hall Announcement: Jan 18th @7pm

By | Access, Community, News | No Comments

The OAC is excited to announce our next Virtual Town Hall to be held Monday, January 18th, at 7pm.

In this Town Hall, the volunteers of the OAC will discuss current access concerns that affect your favourite crags across Ontario. We‚Äôll share the actions we’re taking to address key access issues and our priorities for the Spring 2021 climbing season.

If you‚Äôve been feeling a bit out of the loop, this is a great opportunity to learn about the work our volunteers do on behalf of our community. We’ll open the floor to questions, and we encourage you to email us with specific topics you’d like to see addressed ahead of time. Please send any inquiries to info@ontarioallianceofclimbers.ca.

Register for the Town Hall in advance! We hope to see you there.

OAC 2020 AGM Recap

By | Access, Community, Events | No Comments

Thank you to everyone who tuned in for our AGM last Monday!  We had great turnout, with at least 71 members tuning in.  Congratulations to Randy Kielbasiewicz, Patrick Lam, and Mike Makischuk, who have all been re-elected to the Board for another two-year term.  Randy and Mike Penney will also continue to serve as Co-Chairs of the Board.

Our meeting minutes and a summary of our Access Sends for the 2019-2020 year can be found below:

A complete recording of the meeting is available below:

Thanks everyone, we’ll see you soon!

Support the Metcalfe Toilet Fund

By | Access | No Comments

We decided to spruce up the Metcalfe parking lot with the addition of two porta potties for the rest of the season!

The surge in visitors to our green spaces has unfortunately meant that our parks are becoming littered and filled with waste.¬† In an effort to help keep our crags clean, we’ve fronted the $1000 bill for toilet service which will help climbers and hikers alike.

Please consider making a donation to support this initiative!¬† We’d like to recoup the costs so that we can continue to finance crag improvements on an ongoing basis.

Thank you, and see you out there!

Lion’s Head Climbing Access

By | Access | 2 Comments

Climbing access at Lion’s Head has always been an extremely delicate issue.  We would like to update the community and provide some clarity to the events which have transpired over the past few months.

On May 12th, we were notified by a community member about hanger removal from select routes on Latvian Ledge.  The OAC did not consult on, nor condone the hanger removal.  We have made attempts to reach out to the individual(s) responsible, and while they have not come forward directly, we believe that the hangers were removed in order to reduce large group impacts and encourage regeneration of Latvian Ledge. More recently on June 25th, we were notified that the Stinger Gully fixed ropes have also been removed. Though not confirmed, we believe the fixed lines were removed to discourage hikers from descending and finding themselves unable to exit safely.

The OAC does not condone unilateral route removal.  However, we acknowledge that the impact observed on the Latvian Ledge is an increasingly important issue that needs to be addressed in order to preserve access. Upon careful reflection, the OAC does not feel it is in the best interest of the long-term access at Lion’s Head to replace the removed hangers and fixed lines at this time.  

If you plan on climbing at Lions Head, please be aware of the removed routes on the Latvian Ledge.  Please also be prepared to Leave No Trace by descending into the crag using your own equipment, and ascending to exit at the end of the day.

This recent series of events has emphasized some of the current issues facing Lion’s Head. As a result, we have developed some best practices in order to promote ongoing access and assist you in your visit to Lion’s Head.

BEST PRACTICES

Know Before You Go. Lion’s Head is an advanced crag and requires advanced technical rope skills to access the base, ledges and hanging belays. It‚Äôs critical you know how to rappel, ascend, self-rescue and navigate vertical terrain.

Do Not Tailgate, party or drink open alcohol on Moore Street or in the Bruce parking lot. Please arrive at the trailhead organized. Grab your stuff and quietly head in for a day of climbing.

Slow Down when driving in town and on Moore Street. You’ll get there soon enough.

Be Kind to Locals. Smile and say hello to anyone walking, running or biking on Moore Street. When speaking to locals in town, if climbing comes up, stress that climbing is safe when performed responsibly.

Pick Up Garbage along the trail whether it is yours or not – at both the top and bottom of the cliff

Leave No Trace. Stay on established trails as much as possible. Learn how to go to the bathroom outdoors. Do it far from any trail, and use a wag bag or bury your personal waste (not your garbage). When possible, go before you arrive at the cliff.

Be Kind to Trees. The escarpment is home of some of the oldest trees in Ontario, as well as sensitive cliff edge ecology. Lion’s Head is no exception. Please do no top-rope off the trees. If you must use a tree or two to access ledges or hanging belays, please take measures to protect the trees and anchor through fixed hardware as soon as possible.

Find Appropriate Accommodation. Sleeping in your car/van in town will not be tolerated. If you must sleep in your vehicle, do your research to find a place to stay beforehand

No Large Groups. If you arrive in a group, split up and swap partners periodically. You’ll get more done in pairs anyway.

Leave Pets at Home. Dogs are not permitted off leash in Lion’s Head Provincial Park at any time. Lion’s Head does not lend itself well to the inclusion of pets due to its sensitive ecology, challenging logistics and confined staging areas.

Stay Safe and leave the ego at home. Do your very best to avoid accidents. Be diligent and help others who might be in need.

Speak Up. If you see climbers acting poorly, please speak up and respectfully ask for their support in keeping Lion’s Head open.

If you see anyone from the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Niagara Escarpment Commission, or the Park, please let the OAC know and refer them to the OAC should they have any questions.

Have Fun!

Rattlesnake Point opens to guided climbing

By | Access | No Comments

Conservation Halton is now allowing guiding companies to run courses and lessons at Rattlesnake Point. As the first step in lifting restrictions on climbing, these small groups will allow them to easily manage the number of climbers at the crag, as well as test that appropriate protocols are in place for when restrictions are eased further.

Please keep in mind that ONLY guided groups are permitted to climb at this time.  Conservation Halton is looking forward to opening their crags to the general climbing population as soon as possible!

Bon Echo and Kingston Mills reopen to climbing

By | Access | No Comments

Bon Echo has reopened to climbing access. The cliff top trail is now open, and the park is also open to car camping! Please remember that to climb at Bon Echo, you must either be a member of the Alpine Club of Canada and access the park through the Bon Echo hut, or register at the park with office staff. Also note that due to the presence of peregrine falcons, routes 1-23 are closed until further notice.

Kingston Mills has also removed the gate locks and is open for climbing. As always, you must stop by the lock office to sign in and fill out the waiver before climbing.

Please keep in mind that we must continue to recreate safely. Follow all government guidelines pertaining to COVID-19, and use our guidelines for climbing responsibly during this time. Be safe, look out for each other, and have fun!

Guidelines for Climbing in a Pandemic Poster
A simplified version of our guidelines for climbing during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Current Status of Outdoor Climbing in Ontario

By | Access, News | No Comments

With the recent announcement of Grey Sauble Conservation Authority properties reopening for public use on June 6th, climbing areas across the province are finding themselves under varying levels of restrictions.¬† We’ve created a table to help the community more easily understand what crags are open for climbing. You can access the table here.¬† This is a living document and will be updated as permissions change.¬†

Please keep in mind that some smaller communities, including Grey County, have issued official requests that non-residents or seasonal visitors avoid visiting.¬† We’ve listed resources for the Public Health Units and municipalities that correspond with the various crags in our document — please use these to determine if there¬†are¬†any regional¬†restrictions.

Currently, climbing is permitted on crown land, where access is tolerated.

Old Baldy is re-opening to visitor access on June 6, but at the time of this posting, climbing will not be a permitted activity. We are in direct communication with Grey Sauble Conservation concerning this. Please stay tuned for updates.

Climbing is still not yet permitted on Conservation Halton properties, which include Rattlesnake Point and Mount Nemo — but we are working with them to determine when we can do so safely.¬†

Bouldering is also not yet permitted at the Niagara Glen, but the NPCA is actively working on a plan to reintroduce it.  We hope to be able to share news of progress here soon!

We previously established a list of guidelines to help climbers decide whether to climb, and if they choose to climb, how to do so responsibly. You can access the complete list of guidelines here. A condensed version suitable for use as a poster is also available below.

If you do go out, this is an important time to make a good name for the climbing community!  Take the time to educate yourself on the best practices for climbing during this pandemic.  Remember to take care of the crag, yourselves, and others.

Please keep in mind that as our situation is constantly changing, it is important to be in the know before you go.  Stay up to date and do your research before you head out.  Please respect all government guidelines and be considerate of vulnerable communities.  Stay safe!

Guidelines for Climbing in a Pandemic Poster